24.11.15

How to make Poetry with a Chisel: Tzara's Chisel


Isidore Isou, a Romanian-born, French poet, founded a movement called Lettrism (Lettrisme) through which, in 1945, he forwarded a historical theory of poetry. According to his theory, Isou distinguished between two cycles of artistic production: The “Amplic” and the “Chiseling” cycles. In the Amplic one, a founding poet creates a paradigm to which each subsequent work of an age is confined.
After a paradigm is created, Isou theorized, writers explore all means of expression within the limits of the established parameters. An Amplic cycle is completed when every investigation of style, within the parameters, has been conducted. After the completion of a phase, poetry must be redefined. After the Amplic, the Chiseling cycle commences. In this phase, poets deconstruct the grand institution of poetry, refuting what had become the poetic norm, and clearing the way for a newer, grander Amplic cycle.



Isou argued that Homer’s writings founded the first Amplic cycle, which continued until the nineteenth century. Tristan Tzara, Isou believed, would lead the new Chiseling phase, violating the tenets of Homeric writing to clear the way for an improved aesthetic. The evidence of Tzara’s ability to do so is certainly compelling. Another Romanian born writer, Tzara became famous among avant-garde poets as the founder of Dadaism. (His contemporaries knew him as “Papa-Dada”.)

http://www.escapeintolife.com/literature-essay/tzaras-chisel/

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... Duchamp droit tout a Tzara....


Zervos. Paul Eluard. Aragon. Elsa Triolet. Mayakovski. Marcel Duchamp. Picasso... Conversation de Philippe Bonnet filmée à Barfleur par Denis Leboul le 7 avril 2015.






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this is it: Marius Hentea: Tata Dada: The Real Life and Celest...


Marius Hentea: Tata Dada: The Real Life and Celestial Adventures of Tristan Tzara

“You'll never know why you exist, but you'll always allow yourselves to be easily persuaded to take life seriously.”

“Always destroy what is in you.”

“Any work of art that can be understood is the product of journalism. The rest, called literature, is a dossier of human imbecility for the guidance of future professors.”

“There is a literature that does not reach the voracious mass. It is the work of creators, issued from a real necessity in the author, produced for himself. It expresses the knowledge of a supreme egoism, in which laws wither away. Every page must explode, either by profound heavy seriousness, the whirlwind, poetic frenzy, the new, the eternal, the crushing joke, enthusiasm for principles, or by the way in which it is printed. On the one hand a tottering world in flight, betrothed to the glockenspiel of hell, on the other hand: new men. Rough, bouncing, riding on hiccups. Behind them a crippled world and literary quacks with a mania for improvement. “

“Not the old, not the new, but the necessary.”

“Thought is made in the mouth.”

“Dada is not modern at all, it is rather a return to a quasi-Buddhist religion of indifference. Dada puts an artificial sweetness onto things, a snow of butterflies coming out of a conjurer's skull. Dada is stillness and does not understand the passions.”

And on the other side for lack of sun there is death perhaps
waiting for you in the uproar of a dazzling whirlwind with a thousand explosive arms
stretched toward you man flower passing from the seller's hands to
those of the lover and the loved
passing from the hand of one event to the other passive and sad parakeet
the teeth of doors are chattering and everything is done with
impatience to make you leave quickly
man amiable merchandise eyes open but tightly sealed
cough of waterfall rhythm projected in meridians and slices
globe spotted with mud with leprosy and blood
winter mounted on its pedestal of night poor night weak and sterile
draws the drapery of cloud over the cold menagerie
and holds in its hands as if to throw a ball
luminous number your head full of poetry

― Tristan Tzara, L'Homme approximatif


DADAIST DISGUST

Every product of disgust capable of becoming a negation of the family is Dada; a protest with the fists of its whole being engaged in destructive action: Dada; knowledge of all the means rejected up until now by the shamefaced sex of comfortable compromise and good manners: DADA; abolition of logic, which is the dance of those impotent to create: DADA; of every social hierarchy and equation set up for the sake of values by our valets: DADA: every object, all objects, sentiments, obscurities, apparitions and the precise clash of parallel lines are weapons for the fight: DADA; abolition of memory: Dada; abolition of archaeology: DADA; abolition of prophets: DADA; abolition of the future: DADA; absolute and unquestionable faith in every god that is the immediate product of spontaneity: DADA; elegant and unprejudiced leap from a harmony to the other sphere; trajectory of a word tossed like a screeching phonograph record; to respect all individuals in their folly of the moment: whether it be serious, fearful, timid, ardent, vigorous, determined, enthusiastic; to divest one's church of eve ry useless cumbersome accessory; to spit out disagreeable or amorous ideas like a luminous waterfall, or coddle them—with the extreme satisfaction that it doesn't matter in the least - with the same intensity in the thicket of core's soul pure of insects for blood well-born, and gilded with bodies of archangels. Freedom: DADA DADA DADA, a roaring of tense colors, and interlacing of opposites and of all contradictions, grotesques, inconsistencies:

LIFE.









this is it: Marius Hentea: Tata Dada: The Real Life and Celest...:

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a terriblE SenTimEntal SounD TrAck to a quite loVerlee Visual preSentation over view of OurAnTi PapA Dad L'AnTiPOpe l'AnTiPhilOSoPhe Tristan tzara..................................................................................

Sooner or later we will fix it sooner or later some how some where we will we shall as dada would 

 _____________________

 

have liked it as DaDa would have



Sooner or later we will fix it sooner or later some 

 

how some where we will we shall as dada would have liked it as DaDa would have


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5.11.15

walser tzara


Wandering with Robert Walser


     Inside “quite a normal folder” for example, they found “two or three sheets of paper with Kafka’s last notes from Kierling,” the sanitarium where Kafka died. In Zurich, they unearthed a letter that Kafka sent to Brod in 1910, enclosing two birthday gifts: “a small stone,” still in the envelope, and “a damaged book” — which turned up two years later at Spinoza Street and proved to be a novel by Robert Walser. Other treasures that Echte described to me included a copy of “Tristan Tzara’s ‘Première Aventure Céleste de M. Antipyrine,’ the first Dada publication, with a personal dedication of the author to Kafka. Imagine that!”
It was nice to see Echte, recognizably the same good-natured fellow who observedthat he enjoyed meeting Walser fans because they are “kind people inclined to self-irony.”

tt

 
Einstein explains that the Africanmask does not symbolize but, rather,
is

the god, and that consequently it‘signifies nothing’, we could imaginethe Jewish mysticism of the trans-xing but unknowable divinitdisplaced into avant-garde Afri-canism, and intthe ecumenicalagreement amongst the dadas thatdada too ‘signifies nothing.’
55
In fact,after dada turned gangrenous, Tzarainvoked Taoism in discussing themeanings of ‘nothing’ at the WeimarConstructivist Congress in 1922,
56
but that may have been in partbecause Taoism could be used to mask any attribution of specifically Jewishmysticism through the rhetoric of animpersonal dissolution of the self.Jewish mysticism, Einstein’s under-standing of African sculpture, Taoismand dada, could mask, frame, or alle-gorize one another.To return to Tzara’s arrival inParis: Everling, in whose apartmenthe stayed, remarked upon his prolif-eration of papers, his endless sending and receiving of mail, to the point that thepolice were tipped off by the post office and made enquiries, suspecting espio-nage. This, too, seemed absurd. Of course Tzara’s tactic of sending dada materialto everyone of influence or interest everywhere has left him susceptible to thecharge of being a mere self-promoter, rather than the high-minded
seeker of like-minded men
he claimed to Breton in their earlycorrespondence.
57
Indeed, Everlingspecifically remarked on Tzara’s harnessing of a supple and tenacious intelligenceto an ‘adaptive Semitic mentality’ devoted to the furthering of his cause as a‘virus’.
58
Troublingly, this
adaptive
Semitic mentality was a truism otherwise setout in the infamous
Protocols of the Elders of Zion
, translated into French in 1920 andreferring to the supposed Jewish strategy of concealment by adaptation to themores of the larger culture, particularly in order to manipulate the press.
59
Tzara’s proliferating papers also serve as a prolix demonic double to Breton’selegant romance of ‘leaving no trace’ (for which courage Breton was specifically applauded by Jacques Rivie`re, implicitly against Tzara, when
NRF 
was trying tomake dada an indigenous, French, literary form).
60
By 1922 Tzara ended up exiledfrom his own dada. Thrilling in print and letters, a giant at a remove – ‘I think about you as I’ve never before thoughtof anyone’, Breton had once written – Tzarawas a disappointing mail-order bride.
61
When Tzarawas first unveiled at the dada Matine´e of 23 January 1920, he readin a grating voice. Anticipating the embarrassment of his accent, he had itmasked by offstage electric bells manned by Breton and Aragon.
62
But his flam-
8 Man Ray 
, Untitled rayograph
, in
Les Champs De´li-cieux
, Paris, 1922. Gelatin silver print,22.2
Â
17.2cm. Photo: reproduced with thepermission of SODRAC.
FAIRE DE SON HISTOIRE UNE BOUCLE (NOIRE)
153
&
ASSOCIATION OF ART HISTORIANS 2009
 
Einstein explains that the Africanmask does not symbolize but, rather,
is
the god, and that consequently it‘signifies nothing’, we could imaginethe Jewish mysticism of the trans-xing but unknowable divinitdisplaced into avant-garde Afri-canism, and into the ecumenicalagreement amongst the dadas thatdada too ‘signifies nothing.’
55
In fact,after dada turned gangrenous, Tzarainvoked Taoism in discussing themeanings of ‘nothing’ at the WeimarConstructivist Congress in 1922,
56
but that may have been in partbecause Taoism could be used to mask any attribution of specifically Jewishmysticism through the rhetoric of animpersonal dissolution of the self.Jewish mysticism, Einstein’s under-standing of African sculpture, Taoismand dada, could mask, frame, or alle-gorize one another.To return to Tzara’s arrival inParis: Everling, in whose apartmenthe stayed, remarked upon his prolif-eration of papers, his endless sending and receiving of mail, to the point that thepolice were tipped off by the post office and made enquiries, suspecting espio-nage. This, too, seemed absurd. Of course Tzara’s tactic of sending dada materialto everyone of influence or interest everywhere has left him susceptible to thecharge of being a mere self-promoter, rather than the high-minded
seeker of like-minded men
he claimed to Breton in their earlycorrespondence.
57
Indeed, Everlingspecifically remarked on Tzara’s harnessing of a supple and tenacious intelligenceto an ‘adaptive Semitic mentality’ devoted to the furthering of his cause as a‘virus’.
58
Troublingly, this
adaptive
Semitic mentality was a truism otherwise setout in the infamous
Protocols of the Elders of Zion
, translated into French in 1920 andreferring to the supposed Jewish strategy of concealment by adaptation to themores of the larger culture, particularly in order to manipulate the press.
59
Tzara’s proliferating papers also serve as a prolix demonic double to Breton’selegant romance of ‘leaving no trace’ (for which courage Breton was specifically applauded by Jacques Rivie`re, implicitly against Tzara, when
NRF 
was trying tomake dada an indigenous, French, literary form).
60
By 1922 Tzara ended up exiledfrom his own dada. Thrilling in print and letters, a giant at a remove – ‘I think about you as I’ve never before thoughtof anyone’, Breton had once written – Tzarawas a disappointing mail-order bride.
61
When Tzarawas first unveiled at the dada Matine´e of 23 January 1920, he readin a grating voice. Anticipating the embarrassment of his accent, he had itmasked by offstage electric bells manned by Breton and Aragon.
62
But his flam-
8 Man Ray 
, Untitled rayograph
, in
Les Champs De´li-cieux
, Paris, 1922. Gelatin silver print,22.2
Â
17.2cm. Photo: reproduced with thepermission of SODRAC.
FAIRE DE SON HISTOIRE UNE BOUCLE (NOIRE)
153
&
ASSOCIATION OF ART HISTORIANS 2009
 
boyant rolling of ‘r’s seemed to sum him up:
63
his fricatives clacked like falseteeth and he made self-portraits out of sibilants, as the very fabric of his name,suitably abbreviated by Aragon into ‘Trtz’
64
: ‘Monsieur tzacatzac parasol cassecase´e glace glisse monsieur.’
65
In ‘Pe´lamide’ Tzara gives Rimbaud’s ‘
Voyelles
aSlavic waterlogging, thickening them with ‘th’ sounds: ‘a o u ith a o u ath’.
66
Germaine Everling reported that Breton would flee to an adjoining room withgrated teeth whenever Tzara started to recite,
67
and Aragon said that Tzara had tobe taught to say even ‘dada’ in a French way.
68
A paradox of this is that theraucous sounds of dada were to be, in Paris, pronounced correctly. Something of Tzara’s being wrong-footed in Paris dada relied on the fact that, by being foreign,his subversions of language were not first grounded in an inviolable French.
69
Forhis first Paris performance, Tzara came on to the stage reading one of Le´onDaudet’s speeches to the Chamber of Deputies.
70
While there is an clear irony tothe recitation of any politician’s speech in a dada context, there was a particularirony to the choice of Daudet (whoever made the choice), as Daudet as editor of 
Action Franc ¸aise
had notoriously promoted a
Protocols-of-Zion
-inflected fear of Jewishinfiltration of economic, political and cultural institutions, and the press.
71
Thatis, Daudet provided a perfectly negative frame for Tzara’s debut.Within Paris dada Tzara ultimately came up against this generic set of xenophobic and anti-Semitic predispositions. When the literary arbiters Andre´Gide and Jacques Rivie`re praised dada in
NRF 
, it was the dada of those ‘legitimateheirs’ of French culture – Aragon and Breton – whose work in language they found admirable or even mentionable. The dada project was the necessary ruin of 
notre
Verbe’; the ‘notre’ signifying ‘French’.
72
When Gide acidulously found thatthe two syllables of ‘dada’ had a ‘sonorous inanity’ and ‘absolute insignificance’he could attribute the origins of this distasteful term to those ‘strangers’ whoimport mediocrity and stagnation into French culture. These strangers include‘the inventor of dada’: young, charming, a foreigner, a – Jew! (‘I knew it,’ Gideassures the reader, signalling that such a character could only be a Jew). Worse:‘They tell me he doesn’t sign with his real name, and I’d easily believe that dadatoo is nothing but a pseudonym.’
73
Dada too is a Jew with an assumed name. TheGide point of view raises the problem that dada as avant-gardism could be alle-gorized by reference to that pernicious fraudulent account of internationalJewish conspiracy, the
Protocols of the Elders of Zion

: dada as a programme of demoralization and as subversion of all social institutions, relying on deliberatedisinformation and a hidden, parasitic, use of the press. Such spurious preceptsattributed to the Elders of Zion, as ‘no morality inpolitics’, ‘one must sow anarchamongst the masses’, ‘power and hypocrisy’, and ‘a senseless, dirty, anddisgusting literature’,

74

could be aligned with Tzara’s dada manifestos’ excoria-tions of morality, sense and logic.

75

On 1 September 1919 an anonymous note (immediately understood to be theeditor Jacques Rivie`re’s) appeared in

Nouvelle Revue Franc ¸aise

[

NRF 

], emphasizing the‘German origins’ of dada. This was a familiar echo of the rightist Frenchnationalist rhetoric crucial to Maurice Barre`s, who lumped the Jew with theHun.

76

Breton immediately informed Tzara of the note.

77

Tzara was apparently too weary, or too familiar, with this kind of rhetoric, to respond directly toRivie`re’s dig directly (‘I ordinarily never reply, outof laziness, to such stuff’),

78
butin a long letter to Breton, on 21 September, he outlined his views: ‘Today one does
FAIRE DE SON HISTOIRE UNE BOUCLE (NOIRE)
154
&
ASSOCIATION OF ART HISTORIANS 2009

tzara by giacometti at moma tristaN daDa At aMamAMa


Tristan Tzara

Alberto Giacometti (Swiss, 1901-1966)

(1949). Lithograph, composition: 7 3/8 x 4 5/8" (18.8 x 11.8 cm); sheet: 10 3/16 x 5 5/16" (25.9 x 13.5 cm). Gift of Tristan Tzara. © 2011 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris
165.1951______________________________________

                                                                                                                                                                                                Whata  great pAintyer 

                                                                                                                                                does witha  a great POet



25.6.15

Toto Vaca

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Tzara, Tristan: Toto Vaca performed by Merle Noir, directed by Mike Edgerton 

 

 

Tzara's poem "Toto-Vaca" is a literal rendering of a Maori song "Kiwi Cries the Bird".



Eugene Jolas writes “Tristan Tzara, who left Zurich in 1917 to organize Dada in Paris, manifested his suspicion of words in a different way. His was an exotic drunkenness, and



his verbal cascades often produced an exhilarating resonance.


While still in Zurich, Tzara once copied some African sound poems from an ethnographic


volume and, in a spirit of Dada fun, passed them off to his friends as original creations. It is historically true that they appeared under his name in the Dada Almanach of that period.”



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l'Homme approximatif part1 (extrait)


Premier poème du recueil l'homme approximatif ...

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--- Published on 9 Nov 2013 Premier poème du recueil "l'Homme approximatif", de Tristan Tzara (1925) dit sur un montage d'images tirées du film de Dziga Vertov "L'homme à la caméra" (1929). Avec la collaboration de Tristan Pichard pour l'espace sonore. Site Petrus : http://www.petrus-fecit.frBlog (littéraire) Tristan Pichard : http://tristanpichard.wix.com/auteurj...

10.12.14

....<. Imagine this> .. ...

.


(collage Hans Arp)




Imagine Tristan Tzara and the Dali Lama sitting down for a conversation about poetry, art, dada; the Lama says all is karma, Tzara all is Dada, Lama says all is incarnation, Tzara says all is writing, Lama smiles and saying  all is meditation contemplation and the 4 noble truths of the Buddha, Tzara laughs Pulling off his monocle throws his pen or typewriter, or keyboard in the air; all is the way it falls and the artist arranges it with imagination.

                                                           Conversation ends : they get up and hug. each goes her own path.

                              every one is fine . Live and let Live.

------------------------------- Poetry is a way to live (and let live).

.